November 1, 2017

LaKota Scott: Woven Jewelry

I'm always amazed by the jewelry produced by Navajo artist LaKota Scott.

Each piece is handmade using copper wire woven around a thin leather cord, and transformed into a mini Navajo basket that you can wear as earrings, a pendant, or, now, a bold cuff.

I barely have the patience to weave at the normal basketry size, let alone the teeny tiny micro 1.5" wide mini size. I am just totally impressed. Scroll down to see more examples of her work.

October 1, 2017

Indigenous Pink Day: Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign

Indigenous Pink Day, on October 19, 2017, is a national breast cancer awareness campaign for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death and the most common cancer found in American Indian/Alaska Native women. 

The goal of Indigenous Pink Day is to educate all Indigenous people about the importance of early detection and remind women to keep up to date on their screenings. 

September 1, 2017

Glamour: Native Representation

I've said this so many times, but I truly mean it: we live in an extraordinary and exciting time. 

Pick up the 2017 September issue of Glamour magazine to see just what I mean. 

While Blake Lively graces the cover, two important articles inside highlight Native American women.


August 21, 2017

Collect and Wear Birchbark Art

In the past year, we've grown close with many local artists who are continuing ancient traditions through cultural adornment and fashion.

One family of artists creates stunning birchbark baskets and necklace medallions that are truly extraordinary.

Brenda and Rebecca Cree, along with Rebecca's son Chuck Stoneboy, create amazing one-of-a-kind pendants and baskets featuring natural birchbark harvested from the Turtle Mountain region in North Dakota.

June 29, 2017

Streetwear: Make a Statement

Throughout the '80s and '90s, American fashion was typified and recognized by two staples: a t-shirt and a pair jeans. The t-shirt became a way for people to announce their feelings or affiliations without ever speaking a word.

Minority designers found the tee to be especially powerful in subverting accepted norms and offering new perspectives. Today, dozens of Native American artists emblazon the standard 'American tee' with slogans and images that oftentimes directly counter mainstream pop culture.

April 25, 2017

Oh No, Valentino | Appropriation and the Case of the Stolen Beadwork

In 2015, Italian fashion brand Valentino looked to Canadian Métis artist Christi Belcourt for their 2016 Resort collection, and it was touted as a beautiful example of a respectful collaboration. The designers at Valentino became aware of Belcourt’s paintings, which are pointillist renditions of traditional Métis beadwork and floral patterns, and asked if they could transfer her painting, Water Song, to a range of fabrics for their upcoming collection. Some fabrics were solid, others sheer, with her dazzling bead-like florals printed or embroidered across dresses, jackets, skirts and tops.